Week Three in Review: Some stats, a Call for Submissions, and a Review

This was a good week! The whole Vita Brevis team is more than appreciative of all of your support and feedback for ourselves and our submitters. Let’s take a look at how we all did–we’ll start with some traffic statistic, review our submitters’ poetry, and then talk about our competitions and general submission opportunities:

likeable-blog-500-2x.png

STATISTICS

We topped 2,000 views collectively (560 visitors) compared to last week’s 1,000 (250 visitors); we’ve topped 500 likes collectively compared to last week’s 300; we’ve pulled in over 90 comments (including our replies) compared to last week’s 40; and we’ve reached 157 followers compared to last week’s 98–and we couldn’t have done it without you–our readers and submitters are the reason we aren’t just a blank page with a fancy name.

SUBMISSIONS

We received 36 submissions! Of these, only eight were accepted–but remember, if your piece was rejected, we only rejected your submission not you, so keep ’em coming–Vita Brevis will be a hard magazine to get into, but that only adds to the merit of getting that acceptance email and to the quality of the overall magazine!

Ann Neilson submitted her “May 17, 2017,” which was a melancholy  poem including fantastic lines such as, “I feel thine absence, I mourn thy loss,/ My dearest friend whom I n’er have met.”

Jamie Dedes sent us her “One Lifetime After Another,” which was a poem bustling with sentiment and lovely metaphors.

Short-prose-fiction submitted “Bedroom Tales,” which was an intimate, atmospheric piece with beautiful nuances such as: “Now, please, don’t move, the cat is sleeping/And dreams of guarding pharaoh’s tomb.”

 Jim Spencer submitted his “At First Light,” which we thought was a very unique poem–short and sweet. Like still-life, it gives us a single moment and accentuates the details.

Willie Smith gave us “No Dice,” a poem filled with character that wonderfully captured the existential themes of futility and meaninglessness.

Kim Whysall-Hammond sent us her “Orphan,” which we chose to publish due to its unique subject matter. It is not so much a theme- or story-oriented poem, but what we can only liken to meta-poetry–poetry which comments on the writing process itself.

And stay tuned for some great posts coming up next week!

FINAL NOTES

We opened a Holiday poetry competition–spread the word and submit your entries! Also, the next competition on our list will have a $15 prize reward, due to supporters donating through our “Support Us” link. The theme has yet to be released, but keep it in mind and check in with us in the next week or so for more information.

If you’d like to help fund more paid competitions, consider “buying us a coffee” (donating $3 to the magazine via Ko-fi) so we can  (i) buy our own domain and upgrade our blog plan for more creative freedom, (ii) host a writing contest every month with a cash prize, (iii) and one day pay our submitters for their work! You can contribute here.


Well, that does it–thank you, WordPress community; you’re not just supporting the Vita Brevis team, you’re supporting a community of excellent writers and poets!

Advertisements

Published by

The Vita Brevis Team

“Ars longa, vita brevis" (art is long, life is short). This maxim so moved us that it seemed only right to title our online poetry magazine after it. It may seem curious that we chose Vita Brevis (life is short) as our title instead of Ars Longa (art is long). But this choice was more than appropriate; after all, the aim of our journal is to publish work that shows a keen awareness of not only art’s beauty and immortality but life’s toils and finiteness. We want to revive and nourish the rich existential literature that forms when art and the human endeavor collide.

4 thoughts on “Week Three in Review: Some stats, a Call for Submissions, and a Review”

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s